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Serena Williams joins board of Silicon Valley firm SurveyMonkey :: Sport :: The Guardian

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Serena Williams has 39 grand slam titles, four Olympic medals, major endorsement deals and her own line of clothing and accessories. Now she is embarking on a new mission: she says wants to help tech companies diversify their workforces and solve one of the industry's most vexing problems.

Williams, 35, will get her chance as she joins a Silicon Valley boardroom for the first time. Online poll-taking service SurveyMonkey announced Williams' appointment to its board on Wednesday, along with Intuit CEO Brad Smith.

"I feel like diversity is something I speak to," Williams said. "Change is always happening, change is always building. What is important to me is to be at the forefront of the change and to make it easier for the next person that comes behind me."

Williams didn't offer specifics about her goals as a corporate director, implying that her presence can help push the company - and, by extension, the industry as a whole - in a more diverse direction. Individual board members don't usually exert great influence over the companies they oversee, although they are often compensated handsomely in cash and stock for their part-time work. SurveyMonkey, a private company, didn't say how much Williams will be compensated.

Williams has been involved in Silicon Valley more frequently following her engagement to Alexis Ohanian, the co-founder of Reddit. The couple are expecting their first child this year.

Like many other African-Americans, Williams says she's disappointed that the vast majority of high-paying technology jobs are filled by white and Asian men. At SurveyMonkey, which employs about 650 workers, only 27% of technology jobs are filled by women. Just 14 percent of its total payroll consists of African-Americans, Latinos or people identifying themselves with at least two races, according to numbers the company provided to the Associated Press.

Williams' appointment is part of the solution, according to SurveyMonkey CEO Zander Lurie. "My focus is to bring in change agents around the table who can open our eyes," he said.

Her connection to SurveyMonkey came through her friendship with Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook's chief operating officer and another member of SurveyMonkey's board. Sandberg's late husband, Dave Goldberg, was SurveyMonkey's CEO before he died in 2015 while the couple was vacationing in Mexico. "I have been really interested in getting involved in Silicon Valley for years, so I have been kind of in the wading waters," Williams said. "Now, I am jumping into the deep end of the pool. When I do something, I go all out."